citizenfable

Just another citizen in another metafable

Foster:

Thank you to Michael Carney and to Pandodaily. I will be checking in with IdeaLists soon, I believe. Hopefully, I have the Right Stuff.

Originally posted on PandoDaily:

Horse head

What do Coca-Cola, Toms, Guggenheim, Viacom, AOL, ebay, HTC, and Kate Spade have in common? Other than being among the world’s largest brands, each have commissioned creative projects through the IdeaLists online creative marketplace. The two-sided marketplace is a place where companies searching for inspiration and creative professionals can advertise campaigns, while creatives can identify interesting and well-funded projects in search of talent.

Started in 2010 by former Tokion Magazine publisher and Bartle Bogle Hegarty creative partner Adam Glickman, the IdeaLists has really hit its stride in the last year, as the business is approaching 150 successfully completed campaigns and saw 48 percent year over year growth in Q4 2012. Campaigns can include everything from a website design to a print advertisement to a television commercial or music video.

IdeaLists is not just a free for all, nor is it a place for an unproven artist to get their start…

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Foster:

Thank you as always hovercraftdoggy.

Originally posted on hovercraftdoggy:

mirrored room infinite reflections art installation german artist thilo frank photography swing matrix movie super cool artmirrored room infinite reflections art installation german artist thilo frank photography swing matrix movie super cool artmirrored room infinite reflections art installation german artist thilo frank photography swing matrix movie super cool art

‘The phoenix is closer than it appears’ – a large mirrored room installation or 4 x 4 x 8 meters creating infinite reflections by German artist Thilo Frank in the gallery at KUNSTEN, Museum of Modern Art, in Aalborg, Denmark. Inside, visitors are encouraged to place themselves on a simple plank swing, suspended from the room’s ceiling, which introduces a dizzying element of motion to their battery of illusory selves.

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Foster:

Most especially, the Lumineers. For you, little blue eyes…

Originally posted on :

Happy Tuesday Tunesday!

This Week:

A love-y but not TOO love-y mix for Valentine’s Day. Kiss or no kiss, here are some tunes for ultimate bliss…with Blackbird Blackbird, The Lumineers, Dirty Projectors and more!

DENY Designs album artist:

Happee Monkee “Love Your Face”

See all the fun you can have with this design here!

Enjoy!

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Foster:

I agree. And with one another we can do anything…

Originally posted on Fashioning Urban Agriculture:

Photograph of people crossing the Buriganga River in Dhaka, Bangladesh covered with hyacinths plants using a floating bridge made of boats. / © AFP

Photograph of people crossing the Buriganga River in Dhaka, Bangladesh covered with hyacinths plants using a floating bridge made of boats. / © AFP

I thought this photograph was perfect to describe the connections that we have to tap back into. We have become so disconnected to the land and the economy. Let’s find connections again!

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Foster:

Check Michael Weinstein’s redesign out for now…Stay tuned for some of my own redesigns of logos that are poor…

Originally posted on Demiurgic:

#20

I’m a huge pro basketball fan. I can be heavily partial toward my beloved Lake Show, but I appreciate the best of what all teams have to offer.  I like certain players on other teams because of their skills, but something shallow like a sharp uniform or a great team symbol can win me over too.

Graphic designer Michael Weinstein has a great revision of the current New Jersey Nets logo.

Although this logo does not have any cringe-worthy features, it comes off as boring and a little aged. With an official move to Brooklyn next season, the Nets should be active in a rebranding process to commemorate the trek across the Hudson. Drastic steps don’t even need to be taken for a modern overhaul to make a positive impression.

This is a fine example of a Nets logo fit for the next decade.  The 90’s-style “Nets” font is…

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Aging Well

Five things that age well.

1. Acrylic paint left in the tube.

2. Wine in the cask or the bottle.

3. Scotch Whiskey in a barrel.

4. Honey, as it settles.

5. And lastly–but not leastly, as my girlfriend tells me–me. Happy Birthday to me.

Fashioning Architecture Weighs in on Brand as Place

This is the first guest post on my blog. Recently, you might have noticed my series on the branding of spaces and places. I thought it fitting to have the perspective of a student of space weigh in here and offer some insights from someone less obsessed with the graphic articulation of complexity and more obsessed with the origins of much of that complexity. I have long been a fan of architecture, but still have much to learn. Thank you to Miss Bozzi over at fashioning architecture for her myriad perspectives and for being a constant source of inspiration. I hope to publish many more of our long evening discussions in the future as I find they keep me grounded and help me to find a balance. Enjoy and thanks again!

When Foster first started this branding series, I was inspired. And then he asked me to write a guest post about branding, specifically branding of cities/countries, from an architectural perspective, and I was honored.

Right off the bat without much research into the topic, I really question if architecture can be branding? Does architecture need to be branded? Why do we need logos and typefaces for cities if the space can brand itself?

But then on the other hand, ‘architectural branding’ has become the new buzzword of the architectural industry in the last decades and rightfully so, since architecture becomes an expression of the newly developed experiential brands. Despite our increasingly virtual world, we still need physical buildings to establish personal relationships with brands and architecture plays a vital role in this equation by not only confining customer experience, but defining it, which is more than any brand can do. I really question the ideology that architectural branding adds significant value. And I am still waiting for a good reason for why architecture itself can’t brand the cities.

Take a look at skylines. I think that you could probably guess which planning committees in the United States use their skyline as a branding form. In some cases the city skyline is a brand. When I look at the silhouette of Seattle, I know right away, “oh hey, that’s the space needle!”  And when I see the Washington Monument peering up, I immediately think “oh hey, that is Washington D.C.!” The proof is in the pudding and the postcards.

Seattle

Iconic Space Needle in Seattle

The District's Obelisk

The District of Columbia’s Obelisk

To be more critical, I really have to examine architecture at a human scale, not from the vantage of a hot air balloon. When you look at a downtown skyline, there is no sense of what the city really feels like, what culture is like, or the people who live there. What about cities that do not have a memorable skyline? What goes on their postcard?

I recently became fascinated with how the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao was constructed as part of a revitalization effort for the city. It turns out that the Bilbao, as it has come to be known, has defined the new cultural position of the city because people come from all over the world to see Frank Gehry’s design.  In a way, the museum has transformed the city and made way for gentrification in the surrounding areas. Although the success of this single piece of architecture constructed in a run-down environment is remarkable, I am left wondering what would Bilbao be like if Frank Gehry hadn’t been commissioned.

The Guggenheim Bilbao

The Guggenheim Bilbao by Frank Gehry

The Guggenheim Museum was supposed to create a new image of the city in an effort to attract development. Since the city’s decisions did attract this outside development, it is now deemed successful. When people visit the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao they leave in awe of Frank Gehry’s Decontructivist work, but are they fascinated by the city and the people of Bilbao? In fact, in Chicago, you can experience a piece of Bilbao at Frank Gehry’s Pritzker Pavilion. Ironic. Or you can go to the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and experience Bilbao. In the end, are all these little pieces of Bilbao spread throughout the world, in fact, pieces of the brand of Gehry?

Image links:

Seattle’s Space Needle: http://www.visitingdc.com/picture/seattle-skyline-picture.asp

D.C. :  http://blogs.state.gov/index.php/site/entry/young_legislative_fellows_dc

Guggenheim: http://www.guggenheim.org/bilbao

New Orleans Branding Different Here

Roof Copy

Roof Copylines

Water is Rising

Water is Rising

Katrina

Katrina

“It’s New Orleans. You’re Different Here.” Or are you? How does one ‘brand’ a place that has just been devastated? Where does it even start? Does the process of design or visual communication even matter at this scale of suffering? To the people of New Orleans–who depend on tourism after major economic shifts in the 50s and 70s–it does.

After the physical devastation of Hurricane Katrina, the ensuing media maelstrom resulted in a tarnish settling over the image of the South’s multi-faceted and multi-cultured gem. So the problem is then very specifically a branding one. The people of New Orleans and Louisiana would take care of the physical space. Peter Mayer Advertising would help handle the image with a multi-faceted campaign explained in part here.

http://www.aminworldwide.com/showcases/details/41/

Though this is not a full look at the incredible body of work Peter Mayer produced for its city it brings to mind some intriguing questions about the role branding places in defining place, or redefining it. Commercial art has not ever been shy about its role in manufacturing image. When combined with the discipline of design and the psychology of Peter Mayer’s public relations team, the city of New Orleans was beneficiary to a positive aspect of branding. A real physical city with real and tangible and hurting people needed real help to bring the tourism dollars back.

Youre_Different_Here_Logo

You’re Different Here Marque

I have heard arguments on the impossibility of branding something as public and multi-variabled as a modern city. In this case, we see undeniable evidence of success. Though we in America will forever remember the travesty of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, some songs ultimately go unsung when things are being rebuilt. In this case, New Orleans is still standing and probably stronger than ever. The city’s people are survivors. The campaign to keep the economy going through tourism dollars was not only a success in branding, but also a shining example of the benefits of commercial art in our society.

I was privy to a lecture fully explaining this body of work through my local Pensacola Bay Area Advertising Federation. Though I understand the ethical implications of generating this type of work for something as ephemeral as a city and its people, it was an incredible experience to witness firsthand the effect the work could have. The potential for art and creative thinking to influence people around the world into visiting a specific region is no small task. It was a pleasure to more fully empathize with the reasoning behind attempting such a task, but also in grasping that ‘re-building’ a city is not always about plywood and nails. Our cities are complex. Keeping them going often requires complex systems of communication and influence that have a global reach. Who better to attempt this mammoth task than a local and passionate agency with Peter Mayer?

Follow their work here. They’ve grown with their city. What type of relationship do you have with yours?

 

Vladimir: Transforming Russia, One City at a Time: Khramov

Kursk

Kursk: Case One

From the city of Samara in Russia, Vladimir Khramov has set himself and his studio Stilistica.ru ahead of the curve with its positioning of cities. Bridging the gaps between graphic design and architecture to create unique and powerful brands, Vladimir’s work is about the experience of form. We are confronted with a city’s physicality in his work as well as its unique story, a rare experience, but one often felt when visiting an urban area. Vladimir’s thoughtful exploration of line, texture, and dimension gives a viewer the chance to experience not just a city but also the history of a place through space in the form of a marque and its range of applications. Keep a close eye on Vladimir and his work as it is representative of something new and something distinctly Russian. In today’s global world, Russia is a powerhouse of design, music, and luxury. Branding happens here. Russia is repositioning itself not just as a place and culture, but also in the world of design. Vladimir’s work provides beautiful evidence of this fact.

Kursk Applications

Kursk Applications

Kursk Progression

Kursk Progression

Kursk: Progression

Kursk: Progression

Another Body of Work for Kursk.

Kursk Case Two

Kursk Case Two

For the city of Samara.

Samara: Explanations

Samara: Explanations

Samara: Map

Samara: Map

Samara marque

Samara marque

Studies

Studies

Samara Brand

Samara Brand

Brand Pin

Brand Pin

Marque Variations

Marque Variations

Samara shirts

Samara shirts

Marque Application

Marque Application

Samara applications

Samara applications

Samara Application

Samara Application

Samara at Night

Samara at Night

Samara Buildings, Travel

Samara Buildings, Travel

Samara Theatre and Arts

Samara Theatre and Arts

The Bahamas c/o Duffy & Partners & Co.

Bahamas Marque

Bringing Together Distance and Diversity through Design

“Every island in the Bahamas needed to be represented and their independent personalities expressed within the overall message. The graphic design solution of the Bahamas identity was the foundation that brought the Bahamian islands a common message that could be broken into differential parts as needed.”

–Bart Cleveland, Adage.com

In 2008, I had the uncommon experience of seeing and meeting the indubitable Mr. Duffy for the first time as a student at SCAD. I watched his presentation, listened to his thoughtful careful words and viewed his breathtaking work with hungry eyes. This chapter meeting of the AIGA in Jacksonville was what graphic design was supposed to be all about. But what was this word ‘branding’? What did it take to ‘brand’ an island chain as disparate and uncommon as the Bahamas? There were so many of them. They all had their own unique characteristics, culture, music, food. And yet, they were all politically and economically connected. Much like any other place. Is it even possible to ‘brand’ something as ephemeral and meaning-packed as a place?

Duffy and Partners work, in cooperation with Fallon Worldwide, raises many questions about place. How do we define ourselves as part of a nation? Can we describe the process of what it takes to become a Floridian, an Ohioan, a Cincinnatian, a New Yorker, a Madrider, a Havanite? What do these places mean to us? What does it mean to grow up there? To eat there every day? To work there? To sleep there?

Think on all these questions and then attempt to think about how the people in the city 50 miles away might answer them. How are they related? Is there some common or shared experience? Now think if this place, this city were an island separated by many dozens of miles of water. These are not just tangible, physical challenges, but problems of identity and boundary, politic and economy. These are the things that make us similar and at the same time, make us alike as humans. The best solution is part of Duffy’s holistic approach to branding. Go there. Meet the people. Listen to them. Allow them to provide the solutions. Allow the work to flow from what they say, what they do, how they do it, and who they are as people and citizens and brand ‘partners.’

Setting the mood of the Bahamas

Setting the mood of the Bahamas

In commercial art, we are often presented with a client and a communication problem whose undertaking may seem impossible. Bringing together so many islands in the Bahamas might have seemed that way on first glance. Patience and the open minds of thinking designers proved different. Here is some of the evidence. However, I highly recommend Duffy’s Book, A Brand Apart, for a more complete and wholesome elucidation.

Bahamas Patterns

Bahamas Patterns

Range of Materials

Range of Bahamas Materials

Full range of islands

Full range of islands

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